Health Benefits of Mesoamerican Ancestral Foods in San Diego (4/13/15)

Health Benefits of Mesoamerican Ancestral Foods

Health Benefits of Mesoamerican Ancestral Foods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Luz Calvon (Ethnic Studies, Cal State East Bay) and Dr. Catriona R. Esquibel (Race and Resistance Studies, SFSU) will discuss the health benefits of ancestral foods from Mexico and Central America. They will provide a recipe and cooking demonstration from their forthcoming cookbook, Decolonize Your Diet: Plant-Based Recipes for Health and Healing (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2015)

Thank you to all the co-sponsors: Sherman Heights Community Center, SDSU Departments of SDSU Chicana and Chicano Studies, American Indian Studies, Spanish, Sociology, Geography and Political Science, Center for Latin American Studies, and Graduate School of Public Health, and the Association of Chicana Activists.

Posted in Aztlan, California, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Cuisine, Chicana/o Health, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Medicine, Chicana/o Sports, Chicana/o Youth, Community, Cuisine, Cultura, Decolonization, Food, Globalization, Indigenous, Knowledge, Land, Language, Maize, Maya, Mexica, Mexican, Movimiento, MuXer, Nahuatl, Nepantla, Palabra, Resistance, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Solidarity, Spirituality, Unity | Leave a comment

A Story Behind the Numbers: Latin America

Times and conditions in Mexico are extremely volatile largely because of U.S. actions. It is not surprising that these actions are coming home to bite us in the ass. The most recent crisis came to a head when the 43 Normalistas de Ayotzinapa were assassinated by the Mexican state.

The magnitude of this atrocity touched off demonstrations throughout the world. It has been hard to explain to my friends why Mexican Americans are not at the forefront. After all a critical mass  of us have crusaded against apartheid and other human rights violations. I guess they expect the a moral outrage from us that takes thousands to the streets. Also evident is that progressive media has lacked the moral outrage expressed toward other issues.

The truth be told, the liberal media is insensitive to what is happening in Mexico and the rest of Latin America. There is nothing new about this, historically pundits have commented on our lack of knowledge of the hemisphere. However, I never expected the progressive media to sound Voice of America. It was important for Mexican Americans to support the boycotts against South Africa, Israel and other nations; however, what is happenings in Mexico is in our own backyard.

I suggest that one of the reasons is that we so called scholars have failed to educate our institutions on the gravity of the situation. I can understand why many white professors have chosen to remain silent but there is no excuse for us who share the history of the oppressed.

Oblivion consumes all sectors of the Latino community.  I regurgitate every time I see Mexican American scholars, Latino politicians and leaders of Latino organizations lined up for selfies with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, paying homage to him. They court the Mexican consul while the parents of the 43 Normalistas beg for justice.

The events surrounding the CSUN-UNAM (Mexican National University) accord are still fresh in our minds as are the actions of opportunist white and Latino professors who saw it as an opportunity to cash in.

We should know better. The reality is that the whole region is on the verge of blowing up as it did in 1910. We should know better because in the words of the great Cuban poet Jose Marti: “Vivi en el monstruo y le conozco las entrañas” (“I lived in the monster and I know its entrails.”). Because we know the monster, we have a duty to politicize the monster as to what is right or to least give the monster indigestion.

It is our duty as professors of Latin America to keep everyone informed, that is why I am so hard on Latinos working in administration. They have failed to keep the administration abreast of the problems of the community on both sides of the border. We must remember that Mexico and Latin America do not begin at the Rio Grande.

According to the CIA World Factbook, Mexico is a nation of 120 million people. Another 35 million are U.S. residents. Proof of their strong bonds is the amount of remittances they send to their nations of origin.  In 2012 Mexicans sent $23 billion in remittances to Mexico, which was 29 percent below the 2006 peak. Other nations in Middle America receive remittances:  Guatemala ($4.4 billion), El Salvador ($3.6 billion) and Honduras ($2.6 billion).  A rule of thumb is that where there are immigrants there are remittances.

Americans cannot afford to keep looking at the region as a commodity. Mexicans and Latin Americans are not objects and a source of profit.

Below is a rough synthesis of the population of Latin America. Numbers and distance are important to immigration.  They are vital to a scientific assessment. The statistics are from the CIA World Factbook that in spite of its sponsors is accurate. Asking why and how we acquire knowledge is basic to historical epistemology.

The following charts show the population of each nation and the distance between selected Latin American nations and the United States. These variables explain the nature of U.S. political and economic hegemony.

Latin America Population

Sources:  CIA Factbook https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2119rank.html .   http://www.distancefromto.net/distance-from/United+States/to/

United States             318,892,103                      Distance

Brazil                         202,656,788                   4552 miles

Mexico                        120,286,655                    0

Argentina                   43,024,374                      5610 miles

Colombia                    46,245,297                      2627 miles

Canada                       34,834,841                      0

Peru                            30,147,935                      3471 miles

Venezuela                  28,868,486                      2804 miles

Chile                           17,363,894                      5267 miles

Ecuador                      15,654,411                      2918 miles

Guatemala                 14,647,083                      1512 miles

Cuba                           11,047,251                      1521 miles

Dominican Republic 10,349,741                        2001 miles

Honduras                    8,598,561                        1622 miles

Paraguay                    6,703,860                        4840 miles

El Salvador                 6,125,512                        1665 miles

Nicaragua                   5,848,641                        1797 miles

Costa Rica                  4,755,234                        2034 miles

Puerto Rico                3,620,897                        2195 miles

Uruguay                      3,332,972                        5462 miles

Jamaica                      2,930,050                        1725 miles

U.S. Mexican origin  35,000,000

Focusing on Mexico: the Mexican population is young; 4 percent are older than 65, 34 percent are under 14. In contrast, the United States is old; 14 percent are over 65. Seventy percent of Mexicans live in overpopulated cities. Rural poverty has reached crisis levels. According to World Bank data, in 2010 sixty-one per cent of people in rural areas of Mexico lived below the national rural poverty line; more than 15 million rural people out of a total rural population of around 25 million.

My own training as a Mexicanist was the National Period and northern Mexico. In conversations with my colleague Alicia Estrada, however, I realize my limitations. She is a specialist on Guatemala and Mexico’s rural south where the Indian villages survived. Most of Mexico’s mestizaje took place in mining camps and centers of commerce. During the Colonial Period, the villages remained intact because they were a source of forced labor for the haciendas.

In order to understand the region more fully, I would have to study the Mayan language; so much of history is written in translation. I always remember the words of my teacher Fermin Herrera (I am older than he is) that many translations of the codices are based on translations by Mormon scholars who translated them through their own cultural and religious biases. History works on the same principle.

What is happening in Mexico today is rooted in the past. The privatization of labor, land and water occurred almost immediately following 1519. It was a process that dispossessed the Indian of their labor, land and water.

It is no accident that Guatemalan immigration has mushroomed in the past forty years when foreign and domestic plantations proliferated there. Formed in 1899, the United Fruit Company by mid-20th century controlled “vast territories and transportation networks in Central America, the Caribbean coast of Colombia, Ecuador, and the West Indies.” Dictators friendly to American and foreign interest ruled Guatemala.

In 1954 constitutionally elected Jacobo Árbenz wanted to reform land policies and the CIA supported a coup. This was followed by genocidal wars against the Mayan people that saw millions of villager bulldozed and the villagers murdered or uprooted.

It is no accident that current Mexican upheavals are occurring in Mexico’s rural south, i.e., the Zapatistas and the 43 Normalistas of Ayotzinapa. There are ongoing assaults in Guerrero. This unrest will continue because the Mexican state and its one percent are intent on finishing the process that began in 1519.

It is important for us who have been part of this history to keep the memory alive and support progressive causes. There is a reason why Guatemalans, Mexicans and other Latin Americans are coming to the United States and the poor are becoming poorer in their countries. If our memory is erased we are dead as a community.

– by Rodolfo F. Acuña

Posted in AmeriKKKa, Ayotzinapa, Aztlan, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Politics, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Classism, Colonialism, Community, CSUN, Cultura, Decolonization, Globalization, History, Labor, Land, Language, Law, Los Angeles, Mexican, Mexico, Movimiento, Neo-Liberalism, Politics, Racism, Resistance, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Solidarity, Unity | Leave a comment

¡Ban This! The BSP Anthology of Xican@ Literature on Sale for $10 for a Limited Time!

¡Ban This!

¡Ban This!

 

¡Ban This! The BSP Anthology of Xican@ Literature

$10.00 / On Sale

WARNING: This book is a weapon. This book is extremely dangerous. This book is explosive. This book is illegal. This book could land you in jail!

Broken Sword Publications proudly presents, ¡Ban This! The BSP Anthology of Xican@ Literature, an unparalleled survey of some the best Xican@ voices of the modern era.

Santino J. Rivera, author and indie publisher, introduces readers to the most significant and compelling voices of the Xican@ movement since Message to Aztlán.

Selecting the best literature available from barrios coast to coast, Rivera has created an anthology that in itself is an act of defiance to those who would ban books, censor culture and re-write history. This collection reflects both a dynamic and cohesive portrait of modern Xican@ literature – which is American literature. These are the stories for a new generation of revolutionaries.

This groundbreaking anthology includes works by Francisco X. Alarcón, Gustavo Arellano, Lalo Alcaraz, Luis Alberto Urrea, Rodolfo Acuña as well as works from many new voices culled from the woodsheds of Neo Aztlán.

¡Ban This! The BSP Anthology of Xican@ Literature is a weapon of mass education. These are our stories and they deserve to be heard. This book is a tightly-packed tome of literary rebellion just waiting to be unleashed.

Paperback: 334 pages
Publisher: Broken Sword Publications, LLC (July 4, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0615607306
ISBN-13: 978-0615607306
Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.4 x 0.7 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds

Posted in Arizona, Aztlan, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Art, Chicana/o Books, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Literature, Chicana/o Poetry, Chicana/o Politics, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Prose, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, Education, History, Indigenous, Knowledge, Language, Library, Maize, Mexica, Mexican, Movimiento, MuXer, Nahuatl, Nepantla, Palabra, Politics, Quotes, Resistance, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Unity | Leave a comment

4th Annual Gloria Anzaldúa Luncheon: Honoring Queer Feminists of Color

4th Annual Gloria Anzaldúa Luncheon

4th Annual Gloria Anzaldúa Luncheon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join Queer People of Color and Allies (QPOCA) as we host our fourth annual Gloria Anzaldúa Luncheon, which serves to honor the legacy left behind by queer Chicana feminist and UT alumna, Gloria Anzaldúa.

The Gloria Anzaldúa Luncheon was created to make space for queer feminists of color, who are constantly marginalized and silenced by society. Previous keynote speakers include Cherríe Moraga, Kim Katrin Milan, and Mia Mingus.

This year we are pleased to announce our keynote speaker, Luna Merbruja! Luna is the author of Trauma Queen, a member of the 2014 Trans 100 List, international performance artist, and co-coordinator of the 2014 International Trans Women of Color Network Gathering. She is currently based in Central California and working towards her career as a sex and trauma therapist.

The luncheon will take place at the Student Activity Center Ballroom (SAC 2.410) on Tuesday, March 31st from 12:00PM to 2:00PM.

Please RSVP by Monday, March 30th at 5:00PM. We will only be able to seat the first 200 people who RSVP.

http://goo.gl/forms/aWK0CaGvxd

There will be lunch provided with vegetarian options available.

If you have any other dietary needs/restrictions or if you need any accommodations for this event, please contact qpocatexas@gmail.com by Friday, March 27th at 5:00PM.

There will also be a workshop with Luna at the Multicultural Engagement Center in SAC 1.102 that evening. More details about the workshop TBA.

Posted in Aztlan, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o LGBTQ, Chicana/o Politics, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, Education, Globalization, History, Indigenous, Knowledge, Language, Mexican, MuXer, Nepantla, Palabra, Politics, Resistance, Sexuality, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Solidarity, Spirituality, Texas, Transnational, Unity, University of Texas at Austin | Leave a comment

2nd Annual La Conferencia, Cultivate: Educación. Empowerment. Comunidad in Utah with Dr. Anita Tijerina-Revilla

2nd Annual La Conferencia

2nd Annual La Conferencia

Posted in Aztlan, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o Healing, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, Family, Gender, Globalization, History, Indigenous, Knowledge, Labor, Land, Language, Law, Maize, Mexican, Movimiento, MuXer, Nepantla, Palabra, Politics, Resistance, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Social Media, Solidarity, Student Empowerment, Transnational, Unity | Leave a comment

May Day March in Los Angeles 2015

May Day March

May Day March

Posted in Ayotzinapa, Aztlan, California, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Politics, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, Education, Gentrification, Globalization, History, Indigenous, Knowledge, Labor, Land, Language, Law, Los Angeles, May Day, MEChA, Mexica, Mexican, Migrant, Movimiento, MuXer, Palabra, Police Brutality, Racism, Resistance, Sexism, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Social Media, Solidarity, Transnational, Unity | Leave a comment

Chicago Stands with Ayotzinapa

Caravana 43: Families of Ayotzinapa Students in Chicago

Caravana 43: Families of Ayotzinapa Students in Chicago

 

Caravana 43, families of the 43 missing ‪#‎Ayotzinapa‬ students, are traveling across the U.S. to share their stories, demand the U.S. end military aid to Mexico, and demand the return of the missing students. They will be in Chicago from April 4-6.  

Saturday 4/4

11am March
Leaving Providence of God Church  (717 W. 18th St) down 18th street to St. Pius Church (19th & Ashland)

1:30pm Community Forum 
St Pius Church (19th & Ashland)

7:00pm Panel
National Museum of Mexican Art (1852 W 19th St)

Sunday 4/5

The parents will be participating in various activities with churches and community groups in Chicago

Monday 4/6

9am Press Conference
Workers United (333 S. Ashland Ave)

10:00 am March
Leaving Union Park (Ashland & Ogden) to Mexican Consulate

10:30 am Protest
Mexican Consulate (204 S. Ashland Ave)

FAQs from Caravana 43 Chicago Committee

What does Ayotzinapa refer to?

The Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College in the State of Guerrero, Mexico is one of several such institutions created in the 1930s to educate teachers to serve the country’s rural population. The demand for free, lay, public education came out of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and led to the founding of the National Autonomous University and later of state colleges and the rural teachers colleges. The rural college faculties and students have always been highly politicized, linked to social movements of peasants and workers.

What happened to the Ayotzinapa students?

On September 26, 2014 a group of students was attacked by the police and other people in the city of Iguala, leaving six dead, 25 or more wounded, and 43 disappeared. While there have been several official and other unofficial investigations as of this date (January 2015) we have no clear idea of what happened to the students. We don’t know who killed, wounded, or kidnapped them, nor do we have a clear motive. However, over the course of independent investigations, more and more evidence points to Mexican military involvement in the disappearances

What does the government say?

The Mexican federal government has said that the mayor of Iguala and his wife ordered the police to repress the students and that they in turn turned them over to a gang called Guerreros Unidos (United Warriors) which killed them and burned their bodies alive. The Mexican Attorney General has declared the case to be closed.The problem is that Mexico has a long history documented by Mexican and foreign human rights organizations, other governments, and international organizations of using torture to extract confessions which are then used to construct narratives to protect criminals, the police, military officers, government officials, and politicians. Consequently, many people have no faith in the government’s account and have demanded that the investigations continue.

What do the parents, friends, and fellow students of Ayotzinapa want?

The principal demand of the Ayotzinapa solidarity movement has been, “They were taken alive, and alive we want them back.” The other major demand has been for the continued investigation into the killings and kidnappings to continue. At the same time, the solidarity movement which involves many organizations has raised a variety of other demands from the call for the resignation of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto to a halt to U.S. military support to Mexico. There has also been a call by Archbishop Raúl Vera for a “constituent congress” for the “refoundation of Mexico.” The movement has become very large and broad and no single organization speaks for it.

Why the Ayotzinapa Parents’ Caravan of the United States?

The Ayotzinapa Parents’ Caravan is coordinated by a national coalition of many groups and organizations intended to create a platform for the parents of the victims of the Ayotzinapa killings and kidnappings that took place on September 26 in Iguala, Mexico. By creating an opportunity for the parents to travel throughout the United States and speak about their experience, we hope to better inform the American public and the news media, and thereby possibly have some impact on both the Mexican and American governments.

The caravan has no connection to any political party or other national organization. 

The caravan is entirely voluntary, raising just enough money to pay for its costs. There are no paid positions. Each group in a particular city will be responsible for organizing the Caravan locally and for raising its own funds to cover general transportation and logistics costs. Each area will provide housing, transportation, translation and accompaniment for the parents. A group of 16 parents, students and advocates will be coming to the United States.

They will be divided into three groups that will travel from the US/Mexico border along the Pacific, central and Atlantic states covering 30 cities, 19 states and the District of Colombia. All three groups will converge in Washington and New York City.

Share this! (You know you want to.)

Posted in AmeriKKKa, Ayotzinapa, Aztlan, Chicago, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o Healing, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Politics, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Decolonization, Education, Globalization, History, Illinois, Indigenous, Knowledge, Land, Language, Law, Mexican, Mexico, Movimiento, MuXer, Nepantla, Palabra, Politics, Quotes, Racism, Resistance, Sexism, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Social Media, Unity | Leave a comment

A Short Essay on Chicano Photography (4/25/15)

Collectors Talk w/The Durón Family

Collectors Talk w/The Durón Family

 

On Saturday, April 25, 2015 from 3pm-5pm, at 685 Venice Blvd., Venice, CA (Old Venice Police Station), SPARC’s historic headquarters since 1977, The Durón Gallery at SPARC will present a ‘Collectors Talk’. Using the current exhibition, “A Short Essay of Chicano Photography” as a backdrop, Mary, Armando and Isabel (their daughter) discuss the process of collecting and their individual perspectives. Armando has been the voice of the collection thus far, but now Mary and Isabel (a UCLA doctoral student in Chicano Studies) speak publicly for the first time on their own perspectives in a casual conversation “Collectors Talk”. The conversation will be followed by a closing reception until 5pm.

The Durón Family Collection consists of hundreds of works, together with an extensive library of books, catalogs and ephemera collected over 30 years. Armando Durón has spoken and written widely as a knowledgeable collector on Chicano art of Los Angeles. His unique perspective as a collector, long-time friend of Chicano(a) artists and avid student on the subject is widely sought from Los Angeles, to the Smithsonian, from high school students to professional appraisers. Durón writes an occasional column for Brooklyn & Boyle newspaper, “From the Living Room Couch” on Chicano art. Works from the collection are regularly shown throughout the country.

About SPARC: SPARC is a community-based non-profit arts organization founded in 1976 by Distinguished UCLA professor and artist Judy Baca, filmmaker Donna Deitch, and artist Christina Schlesinger. SPARC is rooted in Art, Education, Community and Social Justice. The Mission of the Durón Gallery at SPARC is to present socially relevant and politically conscious art, weather visual or performing, especially for underserved audiences, by established and emerging artists, artists’ collectives and student projects. For more info visit: http://www.SPARCinLA.org

Posted in Aztlan, California, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Photography, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, East Los Angeles, Education, Family, History, Knowledge, Los Angeles, Mexican, Movimiento, Palabra, Photography, Resistance, Social justice, Social Media, Solidarity, SPARC, Student Empowerment, Unity | Leave a comment

Talk-back with Cherríe Moraga at Franny’s Space (3/25/15)

Cherríe Moraga

Cherríe Moraga

 

Join the theater department in a conversation with Cherríe Moraga, an esteemed playwright and activist, about her work in and outside of the theater!

Cherríe Moraga is playwright, poet, and essayist whose plays and publications have received national recognition, including a TCG Theatre Artist Residency Grant in 1996, the NEA’s Theatre Playwrights’ Fellowship in 1993, and two Fund for New American Plays Awards. In 2007, she was awarded the United States Artist Rockefeller Fellowship for Literature; in 2008, a Creative Work Fund Award, and in 2009, a Gerbode-Hewlett Foundation Grant for Playwriting.

A San Francisco Bay Area playwright, Moraga has premiered her work at Theatre Artaud, Theatre Rhinoceros, the Eureka Theatre, and Brava Theater Center. Brava’s production of “Heroes and Saints” in 1992 received numerous awards for best original script, including the Drama-logue and Critic Circles Awards and the Pen West Award. Her plays have been presented throughout the Southwest, as well as in Chicago, Seattle and New York. In 1995, “Heart of the Earth,” Moraga’s adaptation of the Popol Vuh, the Maya creation myth, opened at the Public Theatre and INTAR Theatre in New York City.

For over ten years, Moraga has served as an Artist in Residence in the Department of Drama at Stanford University and currently also shares a joint appointment with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity. She teaches Creative Writing, Xicana-Indigenous Performance, Latino/Queer Performance, Indigenous Identity in Diaspora in the Arts and Playwriting. She is proud to be a founding member of La Red Xicana Indígena, a network of Xicanas organizing in the area of social change through international exchange, indigenous political education, spiritual practice, and grass roots organizing.

Posted in Aztlan, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o LGBTQ, Chicana/o Power, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Theatre, Chicana/o Underground, Chicana/o Youth, Chicano Movement, Community, Cultura, Decolonization, Education, Fordham University, Gender, History, Knowledge, Language, Mexican, Movimiento, MuXer, Palabra, Resistance, Sexuality, Sin Fronteras, Social justice, Solidarity, Unity | Leave a comment

Mexican American Women in Baseball & Softball and their Struggle for Gender Equality

A League of their Own

A League of their Own

Posted in Aztlan, California, Chicana Feminism, Chicana/o, Chicana/o Activism, Chicana/o Athletics, Chicana/o Baseball, Chicana/o Community, Chicana/o History, Chicana/o Identity, Chicana/o Ideology, Chicana/o Softball, Chicana/o Sports, Chicana/o Studies, Chicana/o Youth, Community, Cultura, Education, Gender, History, Knowledge, Mexican, MuXer, Nepantla, Palabra, Racism, Resistance, Sexism, Social justice, Solidarity, Sports, Unity | Leave a comment